Painting a Blue Horror in 15 Min or Less: TUTORIAL

Painting up a table top quality image has never been easier! Here’s how to paint a blue horror quickly and still wow everyone with these great techniques.

This complete guide revisits the original Blue Horror painted in a weekly tutorial and shows how you can paint one up to table top quality in fifteen minutes (or less!). Be sure to scroll down and press play on the video below to see and hear all the great techniques!

Equipment, start with the Iwata Eclipse, Vallejo Airbrush Flow Improver. The first paint coat uses Verdigris Blue from Secret Weapon Miniatures to apply several thin even coats on the Blue Horror. Next, Arcane Blue from Formula P3 is mixed in to begin a highlight from the top down. Always mix in the previous color to the new highlight to create a good transition. Finally, clean the pot and add pure Arcane Blue to bring out the highlight. Sickly Skin is added to the Arcane Blue to subtly introduce the brighter highlight to the tips and edges of the tails and where the highlight will be brightest. This helps create the illusion that the horrors are made of the magical flame their lore states.

Quickshade Wash Mixing Medium by Army Painter is used to thin down washes and, in this case, mixed with Secret Weapon Blue acrylic wash. With a synthetic paintbrush to prevent absorbing too much liquid and maintain control, apply the wash in the crevices where shadows would lie. Pin washing brings out the highlights by creating deep contrast in the muscles and shadows.

Screamer Pink from Games Workshop is then used, combined with Slowfusegaming Bombwick brushes, to add some color to the tongue and mouth. Screaming Skull from Games Workshop is used on the fingernails, toes, and teeth. Scale 75 Dwarven Bronze is used as to add metallic paints and details to the arm cuffs, jewelry, and dagger. Black Metal is added to the blade as a great silver.

Pink Horror by Games Workshop is used to highlight the tongue. Mephiston Red is used to put color on the fire he is standing on with Troll Slayer Orange as a blend to transition the reds and highlight. The orange is used as a wet blend in this case from the bottom up in order to get the flame effect. Finally, Flash Gitz Yellow adds the brightness and augments the warmth of the flame to bring the fire completely to life.

Overall, using a variety of equipment and paints, getting a model from priming to the tabletop can be a quick process. To see the entire process, press play on the video below!

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